“Can design
change
society?“

The point of departure for the first inquiry is the Bauhaus’ utopian aspiration to create a new society through design. To what extent has this aspiration been realised? Or do we ascribe a greater effectiveness to designers than is really the case? On the one hand, today this aspiration is adopted unreflected in the design disciplines. On the other, society is keen to project the resolution of unresolved questions, conflicts of interests and contradictions on to designers and artists as redeeming experts, rather than face up to the task itself. Do we actually want design to change society? And, all things considered, which contemporary design practices come close to these utopian ideas?

The pressing concerns of societal transformation – growth crises and shrinkage, climate change, the energy turnaround, ageing, digitalisation, etc. – require us to think about possible and desirable futures, despite our lack of knowledge and uncertainty about what is to come. With the crisis in utopian thought in the last third of the twentieth century, long-term and large-scale developments fell into disrepute. How can we now imagine shaping new and different forms of change and the future? What are the target-orientated, but open-ended, forms of work? What role does co-production play? How can we influence the development logic of ongoing modernisation and inscribe it with emancipatory ideas? How do we deal with transcultural questions in global processes? We welcome co-productions.

Events

Publication

1st Publication of “Project Bauhaus”

1st Publication of “Project Bauhaus”

18 EURO

1st Publication of “Project Bauhaus”

1st Publication of “Project Bauhaus”

18 EURO

The first publication of “Project Bauhaus” (only in German) with contributions by Assemble, Pier Vittorio Aureli, Anthony Dunne, Thomas Flierl, Boris Groys, Reinhold Martin, Henk Oosterling, PlanBude, Raumlabor, Tomás Saraceno, Luigi Snozzi, Wolfgang Ullrich, Jean-Philippe Vassal, Margarete Vöhringer and others.

More on www.archplus.net.

Collective for Socialist Architecture: Proletarian Building Exhibition

Collective for Socialist Architecture: Proletarian Building Exhibition

24,00 EURO

Collective for Socialist Architecture: Proletarian Building Exhibition

Collective for Socialist Architecture: Proletarian Building Exhibition

24,00 EURO

The Proletarian Building Exhibition took place in Berlin in 1931 and was developed by the Collective for a Socialist Architecture, who intended it to stand in opposition to the German Building Exhibition. Wohnungsfrage has revisited original historical documents and made them the focus of discussion in a conference run in conjunction with the project bauhaus. Research into individuals like Arthur Korn, Alexander Altberg, and Hermann Duncker and their links to projects like the CIAM, the Marxistische Arbeiterschule, and the Bauhaus, as well as their connections with the USSR, demonstrates the degree to which the networks and political attitudes of modernist architecture were interwoven with one another.

In an empty factory unit tucked away in a rear courtyard in Berlin’s Köpenicker Straße an exhibition was mounted with the humblest of resources in 1931. Conceived as a riposte to the bourgeois Deutsche Bauausstellung (German Building Exhibition) staged in the west of the city, it marked the first action of a group of revolutionary architects, builders, and students, who had joined together to form the Kollektiv für sozialistisches Bauen under the architect Arthur Korn.

Highlighting the catastrophic living conditions in the major conurbations, the Proletarische Bauausstellung (Proletarian Building Exhibition) also furnished a brief world history of architecture as an instrument of power, cast doubt on whether a solution to the housing question could be found within the capitalist system, and unveiled planning approaches imported from the then-Soviet Union. The show was aimed specifically at the networks of modernist architects. Members of the Congrès internationaux d’architecture moderne (International Congresses of Modern Architecture— CIAM), whose preparation committee was convening at the same time in Berlin ahead of the Fourth Congress to be held in Moscow, not only visited the exhibition but also criticized it. Once again, housing had become a fiercely contested arena, and the brief interlude in which political differences had been brushed aside in the euphoric embrace of modernism was at an end.

At a time of running street battles between units of the paramilitary SA and Communist cells, the organizers of the exhibitions presented a polemical juxtaposition of the difference between bourgeois and proletarian architecture. Political and social positioning were deemed to be the basic condition for an architectural stance which was seeking alternatives to a technologically driven and social-reformist modernism. Presenting short contemporary statements and original documents, this volume reconstructs the architectural and sociopolitical significance of this event.

Editors: Jesko Fezer, Christian Hiller, Nikolaus Hirsch, Wilfried Kuehn, Hila Peleg
Texts: Heinz Deutschland, Tatjana Efrussi, Jesko Fezer, Thomas Flierl, Gregor Harbusch, Christian Hiller, Alexandra Nehmer, Philipp Oswalt, Pedro Moreira, Daniel Weiss, Karin Wilhelm, Andreas Zeese

A publication of the project “Wohnungsfrage” at Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) Berlin in cooperation with “Project Bauhaus”.

Publisher: Spector Books, in collaboration with Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2015
Design: Studio Matthias Görlich
German / English
ISBN 978-3-95905-047-0
EUR 24,00

The first publication of “Project Bauhaus” (only in German) with contributions by Assemble, Pier Vittorio Aureli, Anthony Dunne, Thomas Flierl, Boris Groys, Reinhold Martin, Henk Oosterling, PlanBude, Raumlabor, Tomás Saraceno, Luigi Snozzi, Wolfgang Ullrich, Jean-Philippe Vassal, Margarete Vöhringer and others.

More on www.archplus.net.

The Proletarian Building Exhibition took place in Berlin in 1931 and was developed by the Collective for a Socialist Architecture, who intended it to stand in opposition to the German Building Exhibition. Wohnungsfrage has revisited original historical documents and made them the focus of discussion in a conference run in conjunction with the project bauhaus. Research into individuals like Arthur Korn, Alexander Altberg, and Hermann Duncker and their links to projects like the CIAM, the Marxistische Arbeiterschule, and the Bauhaus, as well as their connections with the USSR, demonstrates the degree to which the networks and political attitudes of modernist architecture were interwoven with one another.

In an empty factory unit tucked away in a rear courtyard in Berlin’s Köpenicker Straße an exhibition was mounted with the humblest of resources in 1931. Conceived as a riposte to the bourgeois Deutsche Bauausstellung (German Building Exhibition) staged in the west of the city, it marked the first action of a group of revolutionary architects, builders, and students, who had joined together to form the Kollektiv für sozialistisches Bauen under the architect Arthur Korn.

Highlighting the catastrophic living conditions in the major conurbations, the Proletarische Bauausstellung (Proletarian Building Exhibition) also furnished a brief world history of architecture as an instrument of power, cast doubt on whether a solution to the housing question could be found within the capitalist system, and unveiled planning approaches imported from the then-Soviet Union. The show was aimed specifically at the networks of modernist architects. Members of the Congrès internationaux d’architecture moderne (International Congresses of Modern Architecture— CIAM), whose preparation committee was convening at the same time in Berlin ahead of the Fourth Congress to be held in Moscow, not only visited the exhibition but also criticized it. Once again, housing had become a fiercely contested arena, and the brief interlude in which political differences had been brushed aside in the euphoric embrace of modernism was at an end.

At a time of running street battles between units of the paramilitary SA and Communist cells, the organizers of the exhibitions presented a polemical juxtaposition of the difference between bourgeois and proletarian architecture. Political and social positioning were deemed to be the basic condition for an architectural stance which was seeking alternatives to a technologically driven and social-reformist modernism. Presenting short contemporary statements and original documents, this volume reconstructs the architectural and sociopolitical significance of this event.

Editors: Jesko Fezer, Christian Hiller, Nikolaus Hirsch, Wilfried Kuehn, Hila Peleg
Texts: Heinz Deutschland, Tatjana Efrussi, Jesko Fezer, Thomas Flierl, Gregor Harbusch, Christian Hiller, Alexandra Nehmer, Philipp Oswalt, Pedro Moreira, Daniel Weiss, Karin Wilhelm, Andreas Zeese

A publication of the project “Wohnungsfrage” at Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW) Berlin in cooperation with “Project Bauhaus”.

Publisher: Spector Books, in collaboration with Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2015
Design: Studio Matthias Görlich
German / English
ISBN 978-3-95905-047-0
EUR 24,00

Video
Documentation
of the
Symposium

Watch all lectures and discussions of the Symposium “Can Design Change Society?” on our Youtube-Channel.

Co-Production

We welcome co-productions. We will be pleased to accept ideas, texts and project descriptions for publication and discussion as well as proposals for co-operation and other contributions to the debate: coop@projekt-bauhaus.de